Agenda & Sessions

Sessions take place at the conference hotel (the Hyatt Regency, Baltimore Inner Harbor) and local cultural venues. Session topics and times are subject to change.

Assembly participants: Consider arriving Wednesday night to explore Baltimore or to visit the NASAA board’s open session Thursday morning. Stay through Saturday to catch the Joint State Arts Agency / State Arts Action Network Forum and the Charm City Fringe Festival.

PRINTABLE AGENDA

CONCURRENT SESSION SPEAKER BIOS

  • Tuesday, October 30

    • 10:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
      Arts Education Managers Professional Development Institute*
      • Click for more

        NASAA cooperates with the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) to offer an annual Professional Development Institute (PDI) for state arts agency arts education managers. This year’s PDI focuses on the effects of trauma on schooling, as well as opportunities to promote individual and community resilience through arts education. PDI attendees examine the job-specific leverage points available to them to apply the PDI’s learning in each state. PDI sessions take place at a variety of venues unique to Baltimore that demonstrate innovative and inclusive arts education programming. Visit http://conferences.nasaa-arts.org/pdi/ for agenda details.

    • 2:00 - 5:30 p.m.
      Folk & Traditional Arts Preconference*
      • Columbia & Frederick Rooms, Second Floor

        This gathering provides a national scale and facilitated opportunity to discuss the value and impact of the folk and traditional arts, to consider strategies for increasing support and awareness, and to envision a robust future for the field. Participants include representatives of national, regional, and state folklife agencies, cultural advocates, educators, traditional arts practitioners, directors of cultural programs and community organizations, curators, media producers, and National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) National Heritage Fellows. This preconference is offered through a cooperative agreement between the NEA and NASAA.

    • Evening
      NASAA Executive Committee Meeting
      • Click for more

        Officers of the NASAA board of directors meet in this (closed) session.

  • Wednesday, October 31

  • Thursday, November 1

  • Friday, November 2

    • Morning
      Breakfast on your own
    • 8:00 - 8:45 a.m.
      People of Color Affinity Group
      • Constellation Ballroom F, Second Floor

        Open to staff and council members who self-identify as people of color. Our white colleagues may contact NASAA about other opportunities to support our diversity, equity and inclusion work.

    • 8:00 – 8:45 a.m.
      Research Affinity Group
    • 9:00 – 10:00 a.m.
      Morning Plenary Session
      • Constellation Ballroom A & B, Second Floor

        Christopher Bedford, the Dorothy Wagner Wallis director of the Baltimore Museum of Art, highlights how to engage diverse communities around issues of race, culture and inclusion. He also offers expertise and provocative ideas about forging new pathways to relevance and public value for cultural institutions. Maryland State Arts Council member Carla Du Pree moderates a Q&A session.

    • 10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
      Deep Dives
      • Equity in the Panel Room
        Constellation Ballroom D, Second Floor

        How can your agency guard against implicit bias in your grant-making process? What are the hallmarks of best practices in bringing greater racial equity to arts funding? This session invites you to discuss these questions and offers practical tools you can use to strengthen your funding procedures. Join this conversation to mine newly released lessons learned from the Equity in the Panel Room initiative, which convened public and private arts funders in a rigorous self-assessment journey designed to enhance the responsiveness, accountability and accessibility of arts funding programs.

        Facilitators: Pam Breaux, President and CEO, NASAA; Ken May, Executive Director, South Carolina Arts Commission

        Presenters: Moira Brennan, Executive Director, MAP Fund; Emilya Cachapero, Director, Artistic and International Programs, Theatre Communications Group

      • Communicating with the Media
        Constellation Ballroom F, Second Floor

        Master the art of staying on message! This workshop hones your interview skills and increases your impact as a credible and convincing spokesperson for the arts. With coaching from a media relations and government affairs expert, you learn to answer common questions that frequently arise during arts funding controversies. Participate in this session to gain hands-on experience and learn to avoid common pitfalls in media relations.

        Facilitator: Leah Frelinghuysen, Founder, Monarchy PR

      • Leading Inclusive Dialogue
        Columbia & Frederick Rooms, Second Floor

        Dialogue and collaboration are fundamental to state arts agencies’ work, but it’s not always easy to bring diverse stakeholders together. Rather than relying on the same views and voices, how do we create the conditions for meaningful and inclusive conversations? In this workshop, we explore facilitation methods to expand conversations and tap into often missed but deeply valuable perspectives. Learn practices that level power differences, elevate voices, and ultimately lead to higher levels of collaboration, learning and innovation. This session is especially valuable for anyone who chairs board meetings, leads community based work, conducts trainings or facilitates planning forums.

        Facilitator: Tiffany Quivers, Leadership Development Consultant, Q&A LLC

      • Getting beyond Political Acrimony
        Constellation Ballroom C, Second Floor

        Political polarization and ideological silos are affecting our nation’s public discourse. Simultaneously, many Americans are longing for a new civility and a way to bridge divides, debate issues and find solutions to shared problems. How can arts advocates navigate this landscape of extremes? How can we foster civil dialogue and elevate the value of the arts to all people, of all political persuasions? Drawing on national polling

        data, neuroscience and your own state’s experiences, this session explores ways to build common cause around public support for the arts.

        Facilitator: Kelly Barsdate, Chief Program and Planning Officer, NASAA

      • Stories that Matter: Cultivating Community through Story
        Baltimore & Annapolis Rooms, Second Floor

        Explore the role of storytelling as a tool for conflict prevention, community development and social change. Through examples of social justice, race relations and community cooperation, as well as a collective storytelling experience, Sirah explains how personal relations developed through storytelling can help us to frame discussions to build stronger, more cohesive communities.

        Facilitator: Kiran Singh Sirah, President, International Storytelling Center

      • Transformational Technology
        Constellation Ballroom E, Second Floor

        Across all disciplines, technology continues to transform the way art is produced, consumed and distributed. Additionally, it has the power to increase the reach of the arts and engage audiences in profound ways. During this collaborative session, state arts agencies gain an overview of the challenges and opportunities within the contemporary arts and technology field and explore their role in cultivating practices to support a thriving ecosystem within the greater creative economy.

        Facilitator: Jax DeLuca, Media Arts Director, National Endowment for the Arts

    • 12:30 – 1:30 p.m.
      Networking Luncheon
    • 1:30 – 3:00 p.m.
      Plenary Session with the National Endowment for the Arts
      • Constellation Ballroom A & B, Second Floor

        Acting NEA Chairman Mary Anne Carter joins the Assembly to reflect on the importance of the arts and discuss how the NEA and the states work together to help America to thrive through the arts. This session also features Antoine Hunter, founder of the Bay Area Deaf International Dance Festival, who shares his story of perseverance and achievement as a deaf African-American dancer.

    • 3:00 p.m.
      Out and About: Baltimore Arts & Entertainment Districts
      • Click for more

        The Maryland State Arts Council is nationally recognized for its work with arts and entertainment districts. Now is your opportunity to engage with a few of those districts and see what makes them so special! Baltimore is home to three state-designated Arts & Entertainment Districts, and we want you to go out and explore what they have to offer.

        Explore Baltimore’s Arts & Entertainment Districts at your own pace. Transportation options and arts district opportunities are available in the Constellation Foyer (second floor).

        Bromo Tower Arts & Entertainment District
        “The Bromo” is downtown Baltimore’s Arts & Entertainment District. It is home to more than 20 arts organizations, including Everyman Theatre and the Hippodrome, Maryland Art Place, EMP Collective and Arena Players, the oldest African-American theatre company in the country. Take in a Charm City Fringe Festival performance while you’re here. MORE

        Highlandtown Arts & Entertainment District
        Highlandtown is vibrant, creative, international and eclectic. It is home to the Creative Alliance, Great Halloween Lantern Parade, Highlandtown Wine Festival, Highlandtown Gallery, Y:ART Gallery and more. It’s a neighborhood of makers: designers, jewelry makers and puppeteers work alongside coffee roasters, piñata makers and chefs. Originally settled by immigrants from Germany, Poland and Italy, community members now come from five continents, including Africa, Asia, Europe and the Americas. MORE

        Station North Arts & Entertainment District
        Located in the heart of Baltimore, Station North was the first area in the city to receive the state designation as an Arts & Entertainment District, in 2002. Station North employs an arts based revitalization and placemaking strategy by managing quality public art projects, providing thought-provoking programming, and forging strong, supportive relationships with local artists, designers, residents, businesses and institutions. MORE

    • Evening
      Dinner on your own
      • Click for more

        Best known for fresh seafood, Baltimore’s emerging foodie culture includes a growing craft beer and cocktail scene, restaurants in historic neighborhoods (Little Italy is a short cab ride away!) and a diverse array of dining spots, from casual pubs to diners to waterfront restaurants.

    • 8:00 – 9:30 p.m.
      Donor Reception
      • Pisces Room, 15th Floor

        Todd Marcus

        Join your fellow NASAA supporters to enjoy delicious desserts, celebrate our community and raise a toast to NASAA’s 50th anniversary. Bass clarinetist Todd Marcus performs. All individual donors and conference supporters are invited.

  • Saturday, November 3

    • 8:00 - 9:00 a.m.
      NASAA Leadership Awards Breakfast
    • 9:30 - 10:15 a.m.
      Briefing Sessions I
      • Flashes of Inspiration 2018
        Constellation Ballroom C, Second Floor

        Flashes of Inspiration once again brings you the best and brightest ideas and programs from state arts agencies all across the nation. Enjoy an inspiring mix of fun and information captured in five-minute bites. Half of the Flashes of Inspiration are presented at Briefing Sessions I, and the other half at Briefing Sessions II.

        Briefing Sessions I
        Moderator: Patricia Mullaney-Loss, Research Associate, NASAA

        BRIEFING SESSIONS I HANDOUT

        Minnesota Citizens for the Arts & Creative Minnesota, Creative Minnesota- Local Tools for Advocacy

        Nebraska Arts Council, Mastering the Arts in Rural Nebraska

        Instituto de Cultura Puertorriqueña, Cultura Rodante

        South Arts, Jazz Road

        Montana Arts Council, Montana Teacher Leaders in the Arts

        California Arts Council, Arts Interventions for Social Justice: California’s Reentry through the Arts Program

        Briefing Sessions II
        Moderator: Paul Pietsch, Research Manager, NASAA

        BRIEFING SESSIONS II HANDOUT

        Delaware Division of the Arts, Arts in the Libraries

        Georgia Council for the Arts, Vibrant Communities

        Mass Cultural Council, EBT Card to Culture: Amplifying the Power of Culture

        Kansas Creative Arts Industries Commission, Arts in Medicine: A Study in Interagency Collaboration

        New Jersey State Council on the Arts, Performing Arts Readiness Project

        Maryland State Arts Council, A Marriage Made in Art: State Arts Agency and State Advocate

      • Indigenous Engagement
        Annapolis Room, Second Floor

        Many states are home to large Native American or Alaska Native populations, and relationships between those constituents and public arts agencies can vary widely. This session features four state arts agencies working in concert with the unique indigenous cultures within their states to create programs that support both the traditional and contemporary approaches of native artists.

        Moderator: Clifford Murphy, Folk & Traditional Arts Director, National Endowment for the Arts

        Presenters: Kaitlyn Berle, Folk and Traditional Arts Specialist, Wisconsin Arts Board; L. Saunders McNeill, Community and Native Arts Program Director, Alaska State Council on the Arts; Ashley Minner, Resident Folklorist, University of Maryland, Baltimore County; Molly O’Connor, Assistant Director, Oklahoma Arts Council

      • The Arts and Rural Prosperity
        Baltimore Room, Second Floor

        Join representatives from the National Governors Association (NGA) Center for Best Practices for a special preview of their forthcoming Governors Guide on leveraging the arts to strengthen rural communities. This research, conducted in cooperation with the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and NASAA, examines the arts as a catalyst for building vibrant, resilient and sustainable rural economies. It offers five specific policy options to help governors foster creative enterprises and harness the arts to grow jobs, stimulate cultural tourism and nurture a desirable quality of life for rural America.

        Moderator: Kelly Barsdate, Chief Program and Planning Officer, NASAA

        Presenters: Mike Bartlett, Senior Policy Analyst, NGA; Andi Mathis, State and Regional Specialist, NEA; Sally A. Rood, Senior Policy Analyst for Economic Development, NGA

      • The Rising Generation: A Typology for Engaging Millennials
        Columbia Room, Second Floor

        Engaging millennials meaningfully in arts advocacy has been a recurring topic of conversation in our field. They are already the largest group of potential voters and look poised to influence the American political landscape for decades to come. But what exactly are their political views? As a demographically and economically diverse group they unsurprisingly hold a diverse set of opinions. This session offers an in-depth discussion of a recent study of millennial political ideology.

        Presenter: Abby Kiesa, Director of Impact, The Center for Information & Research on Civic Learning and Engagement at Tufts University

      • Visualizing Equity in Grant Making
        Charles Room, Third Floor

        The public sector plays an important role in advancing equitable arts funding. But how can a state arts agency discern whether the distribution of its grants matches its state demographics? This session helps state arts agencies visualize the answer. It highlights interactive data dashboards that NASAA has created for every state, showing how grants reach diverse populations and underserved communities. NASAA provides an overview of the work, including national findings and the potential benefits to state arts agencies. The California Arts Council then shares how it has used the data for council communications and to investigate program equity.

        Presenters:

        Anne Bown-Crawford, Executive Director, California Arts Council; Josy Miller, Ph.D., Arts Education Programs Specialist, California Arts Council; Ryan Stubbs, Senior Director of Research, NASAA

      • Vitality + Arts
        Calvert & Pratt Rooms, Third Floor

        Arts education programs can inspire and enable older adults to learn, make and share the arts in ways that are novel, complex and socially engaging. These artful aging programs are led by teaching artists whose creative process and understanding of older adults bring connection, improved health and well-being, and a renewed sense of purpose to older adults in community and residential settings. Discover lessons learned and the impact of Aroha Philanthropies’s Vitality Arts program on the field of creative aging.

        Moderator: Sue Gens, Executive Director, Minnesota State Arts Board

        Presenters: Teresa Bonner, Executive Director, Aroha Philanthropies; Maura O’Malley, CEO and Cofounder, Lifetime Arts

      • What’s Your Brand?
        Frederick Room, Second Floor

        Aligning public perception to your core values is one of the keys to a strong and effective agency. When your agency’s public purpose is apparent across all of your communications, your constituents will be more engaged, will better recognize your impact on their lives and will know that they have a part to play. All of this starts with the “face” your agency shows.  Join your peers from the Ohio Arts Council and the Tennessee Arts Commission for insights into how and why they took the time and effort to rethink their brands to align with their work and communicate more meaningfully with constituents.

        Presenters: Suzanne Lynch, Director of Marketing and Development, Tennessee Arts Commission; Justin Nigro, Operations & Public Affairs Director, Ohio Arts Council

    • 10:30 - 11:15 a.m.
      Briefing Sessions II
      • Flashes of Inspiration 2018
        Constellation Ballroom C, Second Floor

        Flashes of Inspiration once again brings you the best and brightest ideas and programs from state arts agencies all across the nation. Enjoy an inspiring mix of fun and information captured in five-minute bites. Half of the Flashes of Inspiration are presented at Briefing Sessions I, and the other half at Briefing Sessions II.

        Briefing Sessions I
        Moderator: Patricia Mullaney-Loss, Research Associate, NASAA

        BRIEFING SESSIONS I HANDOUT

        Minnesota Citizens for the Arts & Creative Minnesota, Creative Minnesota- Local Tools for Advocacy

        Nebraska Arts Council, Mastering the Arts in Rural Nebraska

        Instituto de Cultura Puertorriqueña, Cultura Rodante

        South Arts, Jazz Road

        Montana Arts Council, Montana Teacher Leaders in the Arts

        California Arts Council, Arts Interventions for Social Justice: California’s Reentry through the Arts Program

        Briefing Sessions II
        Moderator: Paul Pietsch, Research Manager, NASAA

        BRIEFING SESSIONS II HANDOUT

        Delaware Division of the Arts, Arts in the Libraries

        Georgia Council for the Arts, Vibrant Communities

        Mass Cultural Council, EBT Card to Culture: Amplifying the Power of Culture

        Kansas Creative Arts Industries Commission, Arts in Medicine: A Study in Interagency Collaboration

        New Jersey State Council on the Arts, Performing Arts Readiness Project

        Maryland State Arts Council, A Marriage Made in Art: State Arts Agency and State Advocate

      • Indigenous Engagement
        Annapolis Room, Second Floor

        Many states are home to large Native American or Alaska Native populations, and relationships between those constituents and public arts agencies can vary widely. This session features four state arts agencies working in concert with the unique indigenous cultures within their states to create programs that support both the traditional and contemporary approaches of native artists.

        Moderator: Clifford Murphy, Folk & Traditional Arts Director, National Endowment for the Arts

        Presenters: Kaitlyn Berle, Folk and Traditional Arts Specialist, Wisconsin Arts Board; L. Saunders McNeill, Community and Native Arts Program Director, Alaska State Council on the Arts; Ashley Minner, Resident Folklorist, University of Maryland, Baltimore County; Molly O’Connor, Assistant Director, Oklahoma Arts Council

      • The Arts and Rural Prosperity
        Baltimore Room, Second Floor

        Join representatives from the National Governors Association (NGA) Center for Best Practices for a special preview of their forthcoming Governors Guide on leveraging the arts to strengthen rural communities. This research, conducted in cooperation with the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and NASAA, examines the arts as a catalyst for building vibrant, resilient and sustainable rural economies. It offers five specific policy options to help governors foster creative enterprises and harness the arts to grow jobs, stimulate cultural tourism and nurture a desirable quality of life for rural America.

        Moderator: Kelly Barsdate, Chief Program and Planning Officer, NASAA

        Presenters: Mike Bartlett, Senior Policy Analyst, NGA; Andi Mathis, State and Regional Specialist, NEA; Sally A. Rood, Senior Policy Analyst for Economic Development, NGA

      • The Rising Generation: A Typology for Engaging Millennials
        Columbia Room, Second Floor

        Engaging millennials meaningfully in arts advocacy has been a recurring topic of conversation in our field. They are already the largest group of potential voters and look poised to influence the American political landscape for decades to come. But what exactly are their political views? As a demographically and economically diverse group they unsurprisingly hold a diverse set of opinions. This session offers an in-depth discussion of a recent study of millennial political ideology.

        Presenter: Abby Kiesa, Director of Impact, The Center for Information & Research on Civic Learning and Engagement at Tufts University

      • Visualizing Equity in Grant Making
        Charles Room, Third Floor

        The public sector plays an important role in advancing equitable arts funding. But how can a state arts agency discern whether the distribution of its grants matches its state demographics? This session helps state arts agencies visualize the answer. It highlights interactive data dashboards that NASAA has created for every state, showing how grants reach diverse populations and underserved communities. NASAA provides an overview of the work, including national findings and the potential benefits to state arts agencies. The California Arts Council then shares how it has used the data for council communications and to investigate program equity.

        Presenters:

        Anne Bown-Crawford, Executive Director, California Arts Council; Josy Miller, Ph.D., Arts Education Programs Specialist, California Arts Council; Ryan Stubbs, Senior Director of Research, NASAA

      • Vitality + Arts
        Calvert & Pratt Rooms, Third Floor

        Arts education programs can inspire and enable older adults to learn, make and share the arts in ways that are novel, complex and socially engaging. These artful aging programs are led by teaching artists whose creative process and understanding of older adults bring connection, improved health and well-being, and a renewed sense of purpose to older adults in community and residential settings. Discover lessons learned and the impact of Aroha Philanthropies’s Vitality Arts program on the field of creative aging.

        Moderator: Sue Gens, Executive Director, Minnesota State Arts Board

        Presenters: Teresa Bonner, Executive Director, Aroha Philanthropies; Maura O’Malley, CEO and Cofounder, Lifetime Arts

      • What’s Your Brand?
        Frederick Room, Second Floor

        Aligning public perception to your core values is one of the keys to a strong and effective agency. When your agency’s public purpose is apparent across all of your communications, your constituents will be more engaged, will better recognize your impact on their lives and will know that they have a part to play. All of this starts with the “face” your agency shows.  Join your peers from the Ohio Arts Council and the Tennessee Arts Commission for insights into how and why they took the time and effort to rethink their brands to align with their work and communicate more meaningfully with constituents.

        Presenters: Suzanne Lynch, Director of Marketing and Development, Tennessee Arts Commission; Justin Nigro, Operations & Public Affairs Director, Ohio Arts Council

    • 11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
      Closing Session & Business Meeting
    • 1:15 – 3:00 p.m.
      Joint State Arts Agency / State Arts Action Network Forum**
      • Polling Data to Empower Advocacy
        Constellation Ballroom E & F, Second Floor

        Recent opinion polling conducted by Americans for the Arts (AFTA) and NASAA reveals surprising insights about public attitudes toward the arts. These polls also offer savvy advocates some useful ideas for galvanizing political support! This special forum for state arts agencies and state arts advocacy and arts service organizations reviews the topline poll findings and invites conversation about how to make the most of the data for state and national advocacy efforts. This session is offered through a partnership with Americans for the Arts.  Lunch is provided for Joint Forum participants.

        Presenters: Randy Cohen, Vice President of Research and Policy, AFTA; Kelly Barsdate, Chief Program and Planning Officer, NASAA

PRINTABLE AGENDA

CONCURRENT SESSION SPEAKER BIOS

* Limited travel stipends are available for these groups, thanks to cooperative agreement support from the National Endowment for the Arts. Contact NASAA for additional details.

** Americans for the Arts convenes the State Arts Action Network in Baltimore in conjunction with Assembly 2018. For more information, contact Americans for the Arts.